Best schools for TCM?

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Best schools for TCM?

Postby rocky1 » Sun Nov 09, 2014 2:58 pm

Hi all,

I am new to this forum so I apologise if this has been discussed previously.

I am looking to start studying Traditional Chinese Medicine in 2015 and am currently trying to decide which bachelor course to enrol in. I understand that certain courses are accredited and recognised by the necessary governing bodies.

My question is: is there a particular course/institution that stands out above the rest for studying a bachelors degree in chinese medicine? The courses I have been researching are those offered at UTS, UWS and SITCM in Sydney (please let me know if there are any that I haven't considered).

Any guidance or recommendation on which course will be best to enrol in would be greatly appreciated.

Past/current students and practitioners input would be a huge help.

Thanks so much for your time,
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby mrpin » Sat Nov 22, 2014 11:35 am

Do not study TCM.
I repeat, do not study TCM.
There is no work, the public has difficulty distinguishing between dry needle therapists and acupuncturists.
The difference:
Weekend course vs 4000+ hours (500 to 1 training discrepancy). Thats 500 to 1!
Dry needling requires no fees (If you are a TCM practitioner you will be bent over for about $700 plus association$400 plus insurance $300).
This is very much a dying field, too many Unis churning out graduates for no jobs and zero work protection, as every other field thinks they own it which destroys the reputation and makes getting clients very very difficult.
I know because I have worked in this field for a very long time and seen pretty much every practitioner go on to other fields.
DO NOT STUDY TCM!!!!!!!!!
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby Sumer » Sat Jan 10, 2015 10:16 pm

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Last edited by Sumer on Fri Feb 06, 2015 10:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby mrpin » Thu Jan 22, 2015 7:13 pm

My pleasure :-)

Don't get me wrong, I love TCM, it works, I hate how it has been watered down and been turned into a hobby for the majority of practitioners.
90 percent of graduates are wasting their time studying it and then spending another year or three figuring out it will not pay the rent.
Massage therapy still pays the bills or chiropractic or Osteopathy. But TCM generally speaking is a dead art and has been destroyed for anything other than academia.
Hope I saved you seven years of muttering.
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby Doc » Sun Feb 01, 2015 11:22 pm

I worked all my life not less then 25 years practicing acupuncture around the world in 6 different countries and I always paid my rent
I don't practice TCM, I practice acupuncture. Most important thing is the observation. Without it you will not progress anywhere. With it you will progress anywhere. Thanks to the observation only Chinese discovered that pulse follows natural cycles resulting from the rotation of the earth, naming them yin and yang, 100 ke, right and left, upper and lower, wei and rong. They realized that they can connect human cycles with these space cycles through the needle or better to say through the blood left in the hole after puncturing as permanent needle (blood is made of iron), inducing human body to repeat normal space cycles, entering into the resonance with them and as result to heal the body. TCM doesn't study it as TCM repeats herbal approach and herbal pulse diagnosis taken by acupuncture 2000 years ago, which don't need all this Qi flow knowledge. As result acupuncture itself was banned in China from 1700 for 300 years by Qing dynasty as useless treatment. TCM and colleges still teach this herbal approach in acupuncture which doesn't give expected results as it teach denial of observation too. Once you see how to observe things through the pulse and not through the book or somebodies words you will not fail. Observation, observation and observation.
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby bonds22 » Tue Apr 21, 2015 8:52 pm

tment. TCM and colleges still teach this herbal approach in acupuncture which doesn't give expected results as it teach denial of observation too. Once you see how to observe things through the pulse and not through the book or somebodies words you will not fail. Observation, observation and observation.
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby Ubik » Fri Aug 07, 2015 8:35 am

I would say to some degree I agree with mrpin in being cautious about studying TCM. I graduated from UWS and practiced for ten years until recently. I eventually became tired of the ongoing challenges of running a practice and more or less gave it up a year ago. I now work as a freelance web developer (a career with far more growth and opportunity).

I would advise those who are interested in practicing acupuncture to consider instead becoming qualified in an allied health profession such as physiotherapy first. This will provide you with solid opportunities for gainful employment which a TCM degree cannot. Then you can always do a Masters in acupuncture at a place like RMIT or the fact of the matter is, you can more or less practice acupuncture as a physiotherapist with minimal training. It is a fact that TCM practitioners get very worked up about, however this fact is not likely to change in Australia any time soon, if at all.

When I first began studying acupuncture 15 years ago, I was 20 and knew nothing about the career opportunities. My teachers at UWS enthusiastically promoted TCM as a real career with a future. They said registration was imminent (didn't happen until 12 years later) and opportunities for acupuncturists would become widespread as it became "more accepted" in the healthcare landscape. In fifteen years I have not seen much in terms of growth or opportunity. There is still no real employment opportunity in the healthcare field for acupuncturists. There are occasionally well established clinics that "advertise" for a acupuncturist but it is usually a part time subcontractor type position rather than full time paid work. And these are rare.

Ultimately if you get a TCM or acupuncture degree, you need to be prepared to establish your own clinic practice and become self employed. Now with the huge numbers of graduates there is a lot of competition for what is essentially still a relatively small niche market. Still the majority of the public are not interested in getting acupuncture, and less in being treating with TCM and all its bells and whistles.

There are two areas in which interest in acupuncture is relatively strong: Pain management, and womens health (read:fertility). For pain management, you need to compete with the growing number of physios who are taking an interest in needle therapy and can offer their patients a solid background in injury management and rehabilitation therapy that those with a TCM cannot. They can also offer a variety of rebates and a degree of accessibility that TCM practitioners cannot. This is unfortunately the reality. The training opportunities for physios interested in needling therapies is growing and some are very good, offering many hours of training and certification. If and when the "science" around acupuncture for pain and injury develops, I'd predict it is physiotherapy that will get on board, leaving the archaic ideas of TCM in the dust.

In regards to womens' health, firstly, the market is becoming saturated as more and more practitioners choose this as their niche because of the demand. However, in the last few years, I have seen this area become more and more concentrated in the area of "IVF support" which garnished a reputation due to a bunch of favourable studies that were published a decade ago. If you choose fertility, you will find the majority of your patients are undergoing ART and less interested in a natural approach, as more and more women are pushed earlier into assisted methods. Also, now, there are an increasing number of studies that suggest acupuncture does not help, and I would predict that this "trend" is slowing down.

So this is just my objective and honest assessment from 15 years in the "industry". I speak from a detached position as it is no longer my vocation. Like I said, interest in acupuncture to a degree is growing in some areas like pain, but this has nothing to do with an interest in TCM. Chinese medicine always will, in my opinion, hold a very niche public interest. It will never become "mainstream". Thirty years ago, when there were very few practitioners, this may have been a market well met. Nowadays, it seems the supply far outweighs the demand with so many new practitioners graduating every year into a profession with NO job market.

Think critically. If you do do it, be prepared for a good few years of real struggle and your best bet is to move to a regional area with very few practitioners.
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby mrpin » Mon Aug 10, 2015 10:13 pm

And then to confuse students even more we get stuff like this lol.
http://www.visabureau.com/australia/anzsco/jobs/acupuncture-australia.aspx
How on earth could there be a shortage of acupuncturists!!

"Acupuncture Australia - If your profession is Acupuncturist in accordance with the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) 2522-11 then you are currently in demand by employers in Australia".
......Say again? Pardon???!!!
We are moving towards evidence based health. So where on earth is the evidence to suggest there is a shortage of acupuncturists??
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby jhonpointing » Fri Dec 23, 2016 4:34 pm

Masters of tcm provides the best Acupuncture in Hawthorn, Victoria, Camberwell that can be extremely effective for every patient. It can give a client total relief from all kinds of pain helping him or her to stay fit and fine till wee hours.
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Re: Best schools for TCM?

Postby TCMclinic » Tue Mar 28, 2017 8:32 pm

Chinese Traditional Medicine, better known as 'TCM' is based on the principle that disease is not solely due to problems in molecular cells but rather beyond the molecular plane, the imbalance of the energy within entire system or subsystems interconnected to form the complex human body.
https://clinic-tcm.com
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