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Research

30/05/2010 - Acupuncture-ameliorated menopausal symptoms: single-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

Country: Brazil

Institute: Medical School of University of São Paulo, Obstetrics and Gynecology, São Paulo.

Author(s): Castelo Branco de Luca A, Maggio da Fonseca A, Carvalho Lopes CM, Bagnoli VR, Soares JM, Baracat EC.

Journal: Climacteric. 2010 May 24.

Abstract:

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of acupuncture and sham-acupuncture on women with menopausal symptoms as reflected in the intensity of their hot flushes and the Kupperman Menopausal Index (KMI).

Method

This was a randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial with 81 patients assigned to two groups: Group 1 received 12 months of acupuncture, then 6 months of sham-acupuncture treatment (n = 56) and Group 2 received 6 months of sham-acupuncture, then 12 months of acupuncture treatment (n = 25). The needles were inserted in a harmonic craniocaudal manner at a depth of about 2 cm, and each session lasted approximately 40 min. The efficacy of acupuncture in ameliorating the climacteric symptoms of patients in postmenopause was determined through the KMI and the intensity of hot flushes. The analysis of variance method for two factors and repeated measures was applied.

Results

The baseline values of the women in both groups were similar for the KMI score and number of hot flushes. At the end of 6 months, the values for the KMI and hot flushes for the women in Group 1 were lower than those of the women in Group 2 (p < 0.05). After 12 months, the KMI and hot flush data were similar in both groups. After 18 months, the values of the KMI and hot flushes for the women in Group 2 for were lower than those of the women in Group 1 (p < 0.05).

Conclusion

Acupuncture treatment for relieving menopausal symptoms may be effective for decreasing hot flushes and the KMI score in postmenopausal women.

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Pubmed ID: 20497031